Biomarkers of milk fat and the risk of myocardial infarction in men and women: a prospective, matched case-control study | The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Oxford Academic

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/92/1/194/4597302

Conclusions: Milk fat biomarkers were associated with a lower risk of developing a first myocardial infarction, especially in women.

Eva Warensjö, Jan-Håkan Jansson, Tommy Cederholm, Kurt Boman, Mats
Eliasson, Göran Hallmans, Ingegerd Johansson, Per Sjögren, Biomarkers
of milk fat and the risk of myocardial infarction in men and women: a
prospective, matched case-control study, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 92, Issue 1, July 2010, Pages 194–202, https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.29054

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Dietary Carbohydrates Impair Healthspan and Promote Mortality: Cell Metabolism

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The prospective cohort study, named PURE, found that in >135,000 participants from 18 countries, nutritive carbohydrates increase human mortality, whereas dietary fat reduces it, requesting a fundamental change of current nutritional guidelines. Experimental evidence from animal models provides synergizing mechanistic concepts as well as pharmacological options to mimic low-carb or ketogenic diets.


Dietary Carbohydrates Impair Healthspan and Promote Mortality

Ravichandran, Meenakshi et al.
Cell Metabolism , Volume 26 , Issue 4 , 585 – 587

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Associations of fats and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 18 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study – The Lancet

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Interpretation

High carbohydrate intake was associated with higher risk of total mortality, whereas total fat and individual types of fat were related to lower total mortality. Total fat and types of fat were not associated with cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular disease mortality, whereas saturated fat had an inverse association with stroke. Global dietary guidelines should be reconsidered in light of these findings.
Associations of fats and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 18 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study – The Lancet, DOI: http://ift.tt/2wquXmY

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PLOS ONE: Man the Fat Hunter: The Demise of Homo erectus and the Emergence of a New Hominin Lineage in the Middle Pleistocene (ca. 400 kyr) Levant

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Abstract

The worldwide association of H. erectus with elephants is well documented and so is the preference of humans for fat as a source of energy. We show that rather than a matter of preference, H. erectus in the Levant was dependent on both elephants and fat for his survival. The disappearance of elephants from the Levant some 400 kyr ago coincides with the appearance of a new and innovative local cultural complex – the Levantine Acheulo-Yabrudian and, as is evident from teeth recently found in the Acheulo-Yabrudian 400-200 kyr site of Qesem Cave, the replacement of H. erectus by a new hominin. We employ a bio-energetic model to present a hypothesis that the disappearance of the elephants, which created a need to hunt an increased number of smaller and faster animals while maintaining an adequate fat content in the diet, was the evolutionary drive behind the emergence of the lighter, more agile, and cognitively capable hominins. Qesem Cave thus provides a rare opportunity to study the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of our post-erectus ancestors, the fat hunters.
CitationBen-Dor M, Gopher A, Hershkovitz I, Barkai R (2011)
Man the Fat Hunter: The Demise of 
Homo erectus and
the Emergence of a New Hominin Lineage in the Middle Pleistocene (ca. 400 kyr)
Levant. PLoS ONE 6(12): e28689. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028689

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